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Chelsea Parade, lithographed postcard, circa 1900. Courtesy of the Antiquarian & Landmarks Society, Hartford, Connecticut, Raymond Cable Collection.

  Little Plain Green, also a triangle, is the focal point of another fine residential district, developed between the mid-1700s and the late 1800s. In 1811 the land was purchased by two philanthropic citizens, no doubt inspired by the gift of Chelsea Parade some years earlier. It was deeded to the city on the condition that it be used exclusively for a park, and was later enhanced by memorials.

  In 1909 the Daughters of the American Revolution refurbished the park in preparation for Norwich's sesquicentennial. The real delight was a new granite fountain, with bubbling drinking tubes for people and drinking bowls on the lower sides for dogs and birds, so that "not only mankind but also the small animal (could) slake his thirst."

 
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he parade became the focal point of a fine residential neighborhood in the mid-1800s, and Norwich Free Academy was built there in 1854. The oldest of the private houses bordering the park today is the 1789 Federal-period Teel House. The Rose Arts Festival held in June features concerts, sporting events, and crafts shows.

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Chelsea Parade, lithographed postcard, circa 1915. Courtesy of the Antiquarian & Landmarks Society, Hartford, Connecticut, Raymond Cable Collection.

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Daughters of the American Revolution Memorial Fountain, color photograph by William Stanley, 2001. Courtesy of William Stanley.

 
 
 

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